From Shots to ThoughtsBy Maria G


Does photography affect the way you look at things in everyday life? Photography has many techniques that can change the perspective of an object, but do you see it just through the camera? 
I’m going to explore this topic. This is a question that I have seen become a very debatable topic. I found out that most of the kids that didn’t take photography thought that Photoshop was just for cropping and putting a filter on things. Although you can do these things, there are many other things you can do in Photoshop as well. For example, you can change the way someone looks using the clone stamp tool or the healing tool. You could also warp something to make it completely different. 
In an interview I did with Chaz from Binghamton High School, I asked her, “When you look at a photo, what do first notice your ?” She replied saying, “Usually I noticed the shapes and the colors first.” I thought this was interesting because I see completely different things. When I first look at a photo, I usually see the techniques or point of views the photographer uses. I also notice the moods of the photo. 
I interviewed Lester, a student in Binghamton High School who does not take photography, to hear his perspective. (full interview in audio) I had also asked a girl in my photography class to see if there is a difference in the way people see things. She said, “When I look at a picture, the first thing I notice are the small details and the types of techniques the photographers use, such as the rule of thirds, narrow depth, up lighting, hard light, or such.”  
I did an experiment with the results I had found. I showed both people who take photography class and those who didn’t take it, a photo and asked them what they saw first. After a minute of them looking at the picture, the results said the people that took photography usually noticed the hidden things in the photo, such as a snowman in the corner. The students that did not take photography had noticed the colors in the photo first. I thought that this was a very interesting discovery. 
I not only asked the students, I also asked my photography teacher, Mrs. Crans. She said that photography does affect the way she looks at things in everyday life. In an interview, I asked her if she noticed things more in everyday life after doing photography, and she replied saying, “Yes. I see that when I take photos through a camera that you have to be very specific in what you want in a photo, even the smallest details, because it’s important for a good composition. It follows me in everyday life because I tend to notice the smaller details people usually skip over.” I also asked her what made her take an interest in photography. “When I was little, my mom had a film camera. I use to play with the buttons on the camera and in really sparked my interest,” said Mrs. Crans. 
Photography not only affected the people who take it, but it also had an effect on people who didn’t. People tend to pay attention to detail more after taking photography. This is a new outlook on life. So, look around— Do you notice anything new after a second time of looking that you didn’t before?

From Shots to Thoughts
By Maria G

Does photography affect the way you look at things in everyday life? Photography has many techniques that can change the perspective of an object, but do you see it just through the camera?

I’m going to explore this topic. This is a question that I have seen become a very debatable topic. I found out that most of the kids that didn’t take photography thought that Photoshop was just for cropping and putting a filter on things. Although you can do these things, there are many other things you can do in Photoshop as well. For example, you can change the way someone looks using the clone stamp tool or the healing tool. You could also warp something to make it completely different.

In an interview I did with Chaz from Binghamton High School, I asked her, “When you look at a photo, what do first notice your ?” She replied saying, “Usually I noticed the shapes and the colors first.” I thought this was interesting because I see completely different things. When I first look at a photo, I usually see the techniques or point of views the photographer uses. I also notice the moods of the photo.

I interviewed Lester, a student in Binghamton High School who does not take photography, to hear his perspective. (full interview in audio) I had also asked a girl in my photography class to see if there is a difference in the way people see things. She said, “When I look at a picture, the first thing I notice are the small details and the types of techniques the photographers use, such as the rule of thirds, narrow depth, up lighting, hard light, or such.”  

I did an experiment with the results I had found. I showed both people who take photography class and those who didn’t take it, a photo and asked them what they saw first. After a minute of them looking at the picture, the results said the people that took photography usually noticed the hidden things in the photo, such as a snowman in the corner. The students that did not take photography had noticed the colors in the photo first. I thought that this was a very interesting discovery.

I not only asked the students, I also asked my photography teacher, Mrs. Crans. She said that photography does affect the way she looks at things in everyday life. In an interview, I asked her if she noticed things more in everyday life after doing photography, and she replied saying, “Yes. I see that when I take photos through a camera that you have to be very specific in what you want in a photo, even the smallest details, because it’s important for a good composition. It follows me in everyday life because I tend to notice the smaller details people usually skip over.” I also asked her what made her take an interest in photography. “When I was little, my mom had a film camera. I use to play with the buttons on the camera and in really sparked my interest,” said Mrs. Crans. 

Photography not only affected the people who take it, but it also had an effect on people who didn’t. People tend to pay attention to detail more after taking photography. This is a new outlook on life. So, look around— Do you notice anything new after a second time of looking that you didn’t before?