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Youth Voice turned 2 today!
Cool! Thanks for reminding us Tumblr :)

Youth Voice turned 2 today!

Cool! Thanks for reminding us Tumblr :)

(Source: assets)

Video

wnyc:


On the Brian Lehrer Show, Doug Rushkoff and guest host Anna Sale discuss a moment in Rushkoff’s new documentary “Generation Like” when he asks teenagers if they know what “selling out” means. They don’t.

-Jody, BL Show-

Generation Like airs at 10PM tonight on WSKG-TV.

Photoset

Congratulations to all our Youth Voice students at Binghamton High School!  You can listen to their radio stories here.

Photoset

Congratulations to all the Youth Voice students from Ithaca High School! We are proud to share the radio stories you produced and are continually impressed by your ideas, creativity, and hard work.

You rock!

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A staff favorite from Ithaca High School students: Clever, creative, and thoughtful. We love it!
wskgyouthvoice:

► Play Zeega ►
Dreams of RetirementBy Molly L

Retirement is of critical importance to the baby boomer generation. It is a way of life for most of my grandparent’s generation, but a concept foreign to my generation.  I am Molly, a student at Ithaca High School. I will be graduating this June with classmates I have known for many years. At this time of my life, the only thing that seems important is college and my immediate future, but what about fifty years from now? I hope to be retired by age 50 (I know you must be thinking I am living in looneyville), however, with the number of people in their fifties who are still working, retirement seems like a never land for my generation.
Retirement used to be a part of the great American Dream. However, today, whether it by choice or necessity, 34% of middle-class Americans see themselves working until the age of 80. This has to do with the lack of money being saved by Americans.  Paying monthly bills are taking away from saving up for retirement. 59% of the middle class focus on paying bills, an increase of 7% from last year. With these statistics, it seems our nation is moving toward a trend of paying more attention to all types of bills and expenses rather than preparing for the golden years.
My grandfather retired in 1996 at age 63. He currently lives in Alfred, NY with his wife, Sue. Since retiring, they have taken numerous trips around the country and spent endless hours watching the different species of birds fly around their land. I talked to my grandfather and Sue about their own preparation for retirement and how they have transitioned into that type of lifestyle.
I asked them: Why did you decide to retire?  ”I had been working for about 33 years and wanted to concentrate on doing some other type of activities like travel, golf, visiting family,” said my grandfather.  For Sue, her office was closing in 1999 and being moved to another location, and she was offered early retirement.
 To prepare in earlier years for retirement, my grandfather started investing in retirement funds as soon as he started to work, so when he retired, he had no concern about his financial needs.  ”I began planning for early retirement about 10 years before my retirement date,” he said.  Sue also invested in retirement funds, but she really didn’t plan for early retirement.  ”It came about unexpectedly due to the closing of my office,” she said.
So, how is retired life?  ”Other than the positive contact with people both in my office and professionally.  I don’t miss the daily schedule,” said my grandfather.  Sue agrees, “I do miss seeing the people that I used to work with and also the satisfaction of completing work tasks.  I do not miss the stress associated with the job.”  Sue is happy with not having a definite daily schedule or the stress associated with deadlines at work, although she points out that she did enjoy her professional career.  ”The fact that I had the financial stability of my investments to rely on, in addition to Social Security, enables me to live a comparatively carefree and enjoyable life.”
On the other hand, my 52 year old mother who hopes to retire soon finds that realistically, she will be working for many more years. I asked her similar questions to those of my grandparents.  One generation later and her answers are very different from those of her retired parents.  (Listen to the full story to hear from her.)
When I think about the responses of the past two generations, I begin to wonder what the answers of the third generation, my generation, will be.  As of 2012, the average retirement age for an American was 67 years old.  Sixty-seven is nearly ten years older than the average retirement age during the mid 1990s.  It seems the opportunity to achieve the dream of retirement is fading away. 
I know my generation has a large amount of time before anything associated with retirement comes to mind, but when is the right time to start preparing?  I am going to start preparing as soon as any sort of income comes my way because, who knows, maybe our economy will get back on track.  Maybe by the age of 53, I will be laying in the middle of a beach on the Florida Coast enjoying a pina colada.

A staff favorite from Ithaca High School students: Clever, creative, and thoughtful. We love it!

wskgyouthvoice:

► Play Zeega ►

Dreams of Retirement
By Molly L

Retirement is of critical importance to the baby boomer generation. It is a way of life for most of my grandparent’s generation, but a concept foreign to my generation.  I am Molly, a student at Ithaca High School. I will be graduating this June with classmates I have known for many years. At this time of my life, the only thing that seems important is college and my immediate future, but what about fifty years from now? I hope to be retired by age 50 (I know you must be thinking I am living in looneyville), however, with the number of people in their fifties who are still working, retirement seems like a never land for my generation.

Retirement used to be a part of the great American Dream. However, today, whether it by choice or necessity, 34% of middle-class Americans see themselves working until the age of 80. This has to do with the lack of money being saved by Americans.  Paying monthly bills are taking away from saving up for retirement. 59% of the middle class focus on paying bills, an increase of 7% from last year. With these statistics, it seems our nation is moving toward a trend of paying more attention to all types of bills and expenses rather than preparing for the golden years.

My grandfather retired in 1996 at age 63. He currently lives in Alfred, NY with his wife, Sue. Since retiring, they have taken numerous trips around the country and spent endless hours watching the different species of birds fly around their land. I talked to my grandfather and Sue about their own preparation for retirement and how they have transitioned into that type of lifestyle.

I asked them: Why did you decide to retire?  ”I had been working for about 33 years and wanted to concentrate on doing some other type of activities like travel, golf, visiting family,” said my grandfather.  For Sue, her office was closing in 1999 and being moved to another location, and she was offered early retirement.

To prepare in earlier years for retirement, my grandfather started investing in retirement funds as soon as he started to work, so when he retired, he had no concern about his financial needs.  ”I began planning for early retirement about 10 years before my retirement date,” he said.  Sue also invested in retirement funds, but she really didn’t plan for early retirement.  ”It came about unexpectedly due to the closing of my office,” she said.

So, how is retired life?  ”Other than the positive contact with people both in my office and professionally.  I don’t miss the daily schedule,” said my grandfather.  Sue agrees, “I do miss seeing the people that I used to work with and also the satisfaction of completing work tasks.  I do not miss the stress associated with the job.”  Sue is happy with not having a definite daily schedule or the stress associated with deadlines at work, although she points out that she did enjoy her professional career.  ”The fact that I had the financial stability of my investments to rely on, in addition to Social Security, enables me to live a comparatively carefree and enjoyable life.”

On the other hand, my 52 year old mother who hopes to retire soon finds that realistically, she will be working for many more years. I asked her similar questions to those of my grandparents.  One generation later and her answers are very different from those of her retired parents.  (Listen to the full story to hear from her.)

When I think about the responses of the past two generations, I begin to wonder what the answers of the third generation, my generation, will be.  As of 2012, the average retirement age for an American was 67 years old.  Sixty-seven is nearly ten years older than the average retirement age during the mid 1990s.  It seems the opportunity to achieve the dream of retirement is fading away. 

I know my generation has a large amount of time before anything associated with retirement comes to mind, but when is the right time to start preparing?  I am going to start preparing as soon as any sort of income comes my way because, who knows, maybe our economy will get back on track.  Maybe by the age of 53, I will be laying in the middle of a beach on the Florida Coast enjoying a pina colada.

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Do you even wonder what led adults into their career field? Some peoples’ paths are more curvy and bumpy than others… But it’s worth it. Especially if you end up with a cool job. Like engineering a live radio show everyday!
nprfreshair:

One thing you might not know about Fresh Air is that many of our team members have been with the show since the beginning—or practically the beginning, over 30 years ago. One of our engineers, Joyce Lieberman, is one of those people.
Meet Joyce:
"I began working with Terry Gross several years after she started doing her show at WHYY when it was a three-hour, local, live program. I engineered many of them. In 1987 Fresh Air went national on NPR as a live, one-hour, popular culture show. I was selected to be the primary engineer driving the program.
To get ready for a national stage Danny Miller, the Executive Producer, and I went to NPR to get ideas for production, directing and engineering. Then I worked with other engineers to build the room, select the equipment and install everything. Now I am the Radio Engineering Supervisor for WHYY-FM in Philadelphia. I take care of lots of the equipment and systems and drive the show if needed. In this photo I’m at the Amek Angela console in the Fresh Air Control Room in 1990. We moved into a new building in 2000 so the Fresh Air Control Room is different now.”
How she got started:  "I was a volunteer at WHYY when there were mostly volunteers doing programs. I joined a group at WUHY, which is what WHYY was called then, called Radio Free Women. Then I decided to get some engineer training. I went to Philadelphia Wireless Technical Institute, and then the station got a Minority Training Grant from the Corporation For Public Broadcasting to hire a woman in TV and Radio. I got the job and was trained in every job at the station. I was asked to join the staff after the year and a half training was over." 

Do you even wonder what led adults into their career field? Some peoples’ paths are more curvy and bumpy than others… But it’s worth it. Especially if you end up with a cool job. Like engineering a live radio show everyday!

nprfreshair:

One thing you might not know about Fresh Air is that many of our team members have been with the show since the beginning—or practically the beginning, over 30 years ago. One of our engineers, Joyce Lieberman, is one of those people.

Meet Joyce:

"I began working with Terry Gross several years after she started doing her show at WHYY when it was a three-hour, local, live program. I engineered many of them. In 1987 Fresh Air went national on NPR as a live, one-hour, popular culture show. I was selected to be the primary engineer driving the program.

To get ready for a national stage Danny Miller, the Executive Producer, and I went to NPR to get ideas for production, directing and engineering. Then I worked with other engineers to build the room, select the equipment and install everything. Now I am the Radio Engineering Supervisor for WHYY-FM in Philadelphia. I take care of lots of the equipment and systems and drive the show if needed.
 
In this photo I’m at the Amek Angela console in the Fresh Air Control Room in 1990. We moved into a new building in 2000 so the Fresh Air Control Room is different now.”

How she got started:
 
"I was a volunteer at WHYY when there were mostly volunteers doing programs. I joined a group at WUHY, which is what WHYY was called then, called Radio Free Women. Then I decided to get some engineer training. I went to Philadelphia Wireless Technical Institute, and then the station got a Minority Training Grant from the Corporation For Public Broadcasting to hire a woman in TV and Radio. I got the job and was trained in every job at the station. I was asked to join the staff after the year and a half training was over."
 

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reportinglabs:

Youth reporters from Searcy High School arrive in Little Rock for their interview with Gov. Mike Beebe.

Very cool!

reportinglabs:

Youth reporters from Searcy High School arrive in Little Rock for their interview with Gov. Mike Beebe.

Very cool!

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Just opened an envelope full of lovely thank you cards from the students at Ithaca High School! 
Great way to end a week of airing their pieces on WSKG Radio.  :-) 
Listen to them here!

Just opened an envelope full of lovely thank you cards from the students at Ithaca High School! 

Great way to end a week of airing their pieces on WSKG Radio.  :-) 

Listen to them here!

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Today’s student piece airing on WSKG Public Radio.  Check it out!
wskgyouthvoice:

► Play Zeega ►
Space ExplorationBy Joseph L

“Space: the final frontier.” That phrase is used on the famous show Star Trek, and it is very true. We as humans are curious by nature, and explored far frontiers on continents, then spread out over the seas of Earth to reach new lands. The American colonists explored and expanded into the western frontier of the U.S. It is only fitting that once we had explored Earth’s lands and seas that we would start exploring the vast expanse of space!
Human space exploration took off in the 1950s with the Space Race between the US and Russia, and many technological advancements were made. In 1969, the US became the first country to land humans on Earth’s moon. After this, manned space exploration petered out, with humans only traveling to the Space Station
in Earth’s orbit. Probes with no humans aboard have been sent out to other planets in our solar system, gathering data on them. Many rovers have been sent to Mars, and a lander probe has been sent to Titan, a moon of Saturn.
Living in a house with an astronomer, it is hard to not become interested to some degree in space and space exploration. Maybe I am not interested in some of the things my father studies, but I still enjoy contemplating space and human exploration of it. Having also read many books and watched many shows that include space exploration, I am intrigued by it. What is out there beyond our solar system? Are there other lifeforms? Watching Star Trek, it is easy to see a future where space exploration is possible. But in our current state of affairs in the U.S., is it actually feasible to send manned spacecraft to explore beyond our own Moon?
Do you think we’ll get a manned mission beyond our own moon in the next 20 to 30 years? Beyond our own solar system in the next 50 to 60 years?
I asked Jonathan Lunine, my father, who currently works as the David C. Duncan Professor in the Physical Sciences, and is the Director of the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research at Cornell University. He became interested in space at a young age, day-dreaming about being beamed aboard Star Trek’s Starship Enterprise.
Here are some stats on space exploration:
$17 billion given to NASA 2013, compared to $900 billion to defense
96% of NASA employees were furloughed by government shutdown
So, why has human space exploration seemingly been put on hold? I asked some experienced astronomers and scientists and see what they think the answer is.
Jonathan Lunine on the exploration of Titan: Recently, he helped with sending a probe to Titan, a moon of Saturn, and on a proposal to send another probe to test the seas of liquid methane that were found by Cassini.
Steven Squyres on the exploration of Mars: Research focuses on the robotic exploration of planetary surfaces, the history of water on Mars, geophysics and tectonics of icy satellites, tectonics of Venus, planetary gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy. Research for which he is best known includes study of the history and distribution of water on Mars and of the possible existence and habitability of a liquid water ocean on Europa. His most recent project, the Curiosity rover, landed on Mars in August of 2012 to research habitability on Mars for a possible future manned mission. 
Listen to the full feature to hear these experts’ responses:
Why do you think human space exploration has been lacking as of late? We have better tech than they did in the 1960s, so what is hindering us?
I have heard that private organizations are planning manned trips to Mars, and have gotten many volunteers. What is preventing NASA from doing the same?
What things could be done to speed up space exploration?
How many years until humans could possibly colonize another planet?
Steve Squyres responds to:
How is Opportunity doing? How does it feel to be roving on Mars for 10 years?
I understand you do undersea exploration. Can you tell me a bit about that?
Why do you think manned space exploration has been lacking since its debut in the mid-1900s?
On NASA’s solar system exploration page, you are quoted as saying in answer to the question “What are your dreams for the future of exploration?” with the response, “Sending humans to Mars, the sooner the better.” Do you still believe this? If so, do you have plans in the works to make this dream a reality?
You are still the chairman of the NASA Advisory Council, correct? Can’t you advise them to delve into more manned exploration of space?
What are some constraints you have encountered in your quest to send humans to Mars? Is it all money issues, or are there other issues at stake here? If so, are there ways you can think of to clear up the issues?
Jonathan Lunine responds to:
Do you think humans will send manned space craft to other planets or outside the solar system in the near future?!
I have heard that private organizations are planning manned missions to Mars. What do you think about this?
I have heard that you were involved in the Cassini mission, and also proposed another new one recently. Can you tell me about those?
Personally, I would be very interested to see space exploration progress outwards beyond our own Moon, and I do hope that humans at least get to Mars in my lifetime.

Today’s student piece airing on WSKG Public Radio.  Check it out!

wskgyouthvoice:

► Play Zeega ►

Space Exploration
By Joseph L

“Space: the final frontier.” That phrase is used on the famous show Star Trek, and it is very true. We as humans are curious by nature, and explored far frontiers on continents, then spread out over the seas of Earth to reach new lands. The American colonists explored and expanded into the western frontier of the U.S. It is only fitting that once we had explored Earth’s lands and seas that we would start exploring the vast expanse of space!

Human space exploration took off in the 1950s with the Space Race between the US and Russia, and many technological advancements were made. In 1969, the US became the first country to land humans on Earth’s moon. After this, manned space exploration petered out, with humans only traveling to the Space Station

in Earth’s orbit. Probes with no humans aboard have been sent out to other planets in our solar system, gathering data on them. Many rovers have been sent to Mars, and a lander probe has been sent to Titan, a moon of Saturn.

Living in a house with an astronomer, it is hard to not become interested to some degree in space and space exploration. Maybe I am not interested in some of the things my father studies, but I still enjoy contemplating space and human exploration of it. Having also read many books and watched many shows that include space exploration, I am intrigued by it. What is out there beyond our solar system? Are there other lifeforms? Watching Star Trek, it is easy to see a future where space exploration is possible. But in our current state of affairs in the U.S., is it actually feasible to send manned spacecraft to explore beyond our own Moon?

Do you think we’ll get a manned mission beyond our own moon in the next 20 to 30 years? Beyond our own solar system in the next 50 to 60 years?

I asked Jonathan Lunine, my father, who currently works as the David C. Duncan Professor in the Physical Sciences, and is the Director of the Center for Radiophysics and Space Research at Cornell University. He became interested in space at a young age, day-dreaming about being beamed aboard Star Trek’s Starship Enterprise.

Here are some stats on space exploration:

  • $17 billion given to NASA 2013, compared to $900 billion to defense
  • 96% of NASA employees were furloughed by government shutdown

So, why has human space exploration seemingly been put on hold? I asked some experienced astronomers and scientists and see what they think the answer is.

Jonathan Lunine on the exploration of Titan: Recently, he helped with sending a probe to Titan, a moon of Saturn, and on a proposal to send another probe to test the seas of liquid methane that were found by Cassini.

Steven Squyres on the exploration of Mars: Research focuses on the robotic exploration of planetary surfaces, the history of water on Mars, geophysics and tectonics of icy satellites, tectonics of Venus, planetary gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy. Research for which he is best known includes study of the history and distribution of water on Mars and of the possible existence and habitability of a liquid water ocean on Europa. His most recent project, the Curiosity rover, landed on Mars in August of 2012 to research habitability on Mars for a possible future manned mission. 

Listen to the full feature to hear these experts’ responses:

Why do you think human space exploration has been lacking as of late? We have better tech than they did in the 1960s, so what is hindering us?

I have heard that private organizations are planning manned trips to Mars, and have gotten many volunteers. What is preventing NASA from doing the same?

What things could be done to speed up space exploration?

How many years until humans could possibly colonize another planet?

Steve Squyres responds to:

  • How is Opportunity doing? How does it feel to be roving on Mars for 10 years?
  • I understand you do undersea exploration. Can you tell me a bit about that?
  • Why do you think manned space exploration has been lacking since its debut in the mid-1900s?
  • On NASA’s solar system exploration page, you are quoted as saying in answer to the question “What are your dreams for the future of exploration?” with the response, “Sending humans to Mars, the sooner the better.” Do you still believe this? If so, do you have plans in the works to make this dream a reality?
  • You are still the chairman of the NASA Advisory Council, correct? Can’t you advise them to delve into more manned exploration of space?
  • What are some constraints you have encountered in your quest to send humans to Mars? Is it all money issues, or are there other issues at stake here? If so, are there ways you can think of to clear up the issues?

Jonathan Lunine responds to:

  • Do you think humans will send manned space craft to other planets or outside the solar system in the near future?!
  • I have heard that private organizations are planning manned missions to Mars. What do you think about this?
  • I have heard that you were involved in the Cassini mission, and also proposed another new one recently. Can you tell me about those?

Personally, I would be very interested to see space exploration progress outwards beyond our own Moon, and I do hope that humans at least get to Mars in my lifetime.

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Did you miss Ploy on WSKG Radio this morning?  This is a great one. 

► Play Zeega ►
Marijuana: To Tax or Not to TaxBy Ploy C

Over the years people’s perception on the idea of legalizing marijuana has evolved. Twenty states have legalized marijuana for medical use. Maine, Washington, and Colorado are the only three states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use. On November 5, 2013, the people of Colorado voted on Proposition AA, which was passed by over 60%. As of right now, Colorado allows adults 21 and over to purchase marijuana. One restriction is that they can only purchase one ounce at a time, but are allowed to grow their own marijuana at home.
Proposition AA enacts a tax that has a 25% levy on marijuana. After recreational marijuana was legalized, this high tax was voted into place.  The revenue brought in is put toward regulating and enforcing marijuana laws and funding education. Or so they say. 
To look more into the opinion of citizens, I talked to Harrison Haverlock, a senior at Ithaca High School, who is thoughtful on the subject.  I also spoke with a former medical marijuana grower, Tim, from California.  (Listen to the story for full interviews)
Now, I think this 25% tax levy in Colorado is a great idea. More focus should be put on education, and that is exactly what the revenues brought in will do. Although taxing is a good idea, it may be too high, making it so there is a risk of the black market coming back. A black market is exactly what law-makers were trying to avoid, so the very high tax might just defeat Proposition AA’s purpose. However, since marijuana can be grown at home, the chances of the black market coming back would be slightly less. 
So, what effect will putting such a high tax on marijuana have? Will it push people back to the black market, or will it pay for itself through the tax?

Did you miss Ploy on WSKG Radio this morning?  This is a great one. 

► Play Zeega ►

Marijuana: To Tax or Not to Tax
By Ploy C

Over the years people’s perception on the idea of legalizing marijuana has evolved. Twenty states have legalized marijuana for medical use. Maine, Washington, and Colorado are the only three states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use. On November 5, 2013, the people of Colorado voted on Proposition AA, which was passed by over 60%. As of right now, Colorado allows adults 21 and over to purchase marijuana. One restriction is that they can only purchase one ounce at a time, but are allowed to grow their own marijuana at home.

Proposition AA enacts a tax that has a 25% levy on marijuana. After recreational marijuana was legalized, this high tax was voted into place.  The revenue brought in is put toward regulating and enforcing marijuana laws and funding education. Or so they say.

To look more into the opinion of citizens, I talked to Harrison Haverlock, a senior at Ithaca High School, who is thoughtful on the subject.  I also spoke with a former medical marijuana grower, Tim, from California.  (Listen to the story for full interviews)

Now, I think this 25% tax levy in Colorado is a great idea. More focus should be put on education, and that is exactly what the revenues brought in will do. Although taxing is a good idea, it may be too high, making it so there is a risk of the black market coming back. A black market is exactly what law-makers were trying to avoid, so the very high tax might just defeat Proposition AA’s purpose. However, since marijuana can be grown at home, the chances of the black market coming back would be slightly less.

So, what effect will putting such a high tax on marijuana have? Will it push people back to the black market, or will it pay for itself through the tax?

(via wskgyouthvoice)

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African Americans in LacrosseBy Brian O

Brian loves playing lacrosse, despite being one of only two African American students on the Ithaca High School lacrosse team. Brian acknowledges the African American players who have paved the way in the national scene and explores how race impacts lacrosse training in his community.

African Americans in Lacrosse
By Brian O

Brian loves playing lacrosse, despite being one of only two African American students on the Ithaca High School lacrosse team. Brian acknowledges the African American players who have paved the way in the national scene and explores how race impacts lacrosse training in his community.

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The Competitive World of FilmBy Oliver W
Hollywood isn’t for everyone. Many people have tried and failed at becoming successful movie directors; the industry does not take kind to untalented folk. I had the chance to speak with Tom Horn, a successful director working in the industry. He has accomplished things in his life that most people can only dream about.  In one of these feats, Horn wrote the script for the hit, Star Trek Voyager, worked on the set of James bond Never Say Never Again; and has been apart of many other big projects. He is also a published author, having written The Devil & George Bailey.  Mr. Horn graduated from UCLA, the most prestigious film school in the world.  It is safe to say that Tom Horn is a man of many talents, and there is much to be learned from him.  (Listen to audio for full interview)

How would you describe the overall competitiveness in the entertainment industry?
How would you describe a successful director?
As a director, do you worry about the stability of your job?
Does your life as a director ever conflict with your personal life?

The Competitive World of Film
By Oliver W

Hollywood isn’t for everyone. Many people have tried and failed at becoming successful movie directors; the industry does not take kind to untalented folk. I had the chance to speak with Tom Horn, a successful director working in the industry. He has accomplished things in his life that most people can only dream about.  In one of these feats, Horn wrote the script for the hit, Star Trek Voyager, worked on the set of James bond Never Say Never Again; and has been apart of many other big projects. He is also a published author, having written The Devil & George Bailey.  Mr. Horn graduated from UCLA, the most prestigious film school in the world.  It is safe to say that Tom Horn is a man of many talents, and there is much to be learned from him.  (Listen to audio for full interview)

How would you describe the overall competitiveness in the entertainment industry?

How would you describe a successful director?

As a director, do you worry about the stability of your job?

Does your life as a director ever conflict with your personal life?

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Violence In Video GamesBy Jamison N

With the release of the controversial Grand Theft Auto 5, the topic of video games causing violence is brought up once again.  Violence in video games has always been perceived as mind altering for the players; mind altering to the extent that it alters the behavior of those playing to be more violent. But could that perception be untrue?
Most parents and adults eventually broach the subject of violent video games thinking they might warp the minds of young children.  Many parents are afraid that their kids will mimic the actions they see within the game.  It doesn’t help that, in some cases, kids blame their violent actions on video games for a more lenient punishment, whether it be with the law or with their parents.  
Others believe that videogames create an outlet for people and that games can help violent kids stay calm.
A study at the University of Texas stated that kids would voluntarily stay inside playing video games rather than going outside and committing crimes.
The same study has shown an increase in anger while playing video games.  This anger was for a short period of time, essentially getting the anger out of their system.  Other studies that have shown video games as having caused aggression have been found to be falsified or resulted from conditions that were ill-managed.  
During the majority of these tests, children have been put in rooms that are not a similar environment to playing a videogame at home. The kids are in labs being tested in a way that does not correlate to video games, but to violent images.  There is evidence outside of labs, though, that show a correlation between violent video games and violent behavior. 
To share some insight on this, I asked a teacher and a student from Ithaca High School to share their thoughts on the topic.
Are you familiar with video games?Have you ever played a video game?What is your opinion on video games?Would you/your parent ever buy an M-rated game for a child under the recommended age?Do you think that video games cause violence in young people?What is your opinion on violence in other venues such as TV or books?
(Listen to the audio for full interviews)

Violence In Video Games
By Jamison N

With the release of the controversial Grand Theft Auto 5, the topic of video games causing violence is brought up once again.  Violence in video games has always been perceived as mind altering for the players; mind altering to the extent that it alters the behavior of those playing to be more violent. But could that perception be untrue?

Most parents and adults eventually broach the subject of violent video games thinking they might warp the minds of young children.  Many parents are afraid that their kids will mimic the actions they see within the game.  It doesn’t help that, in some cases, kids blame their violent actions on video games for a more lenient punishment, whether it be with the law or with their parents.  

Others believe that videogames create an outlet for people and that games can help violent kids stay calm.

A study at the University of Texas stated that kids would voluntarily stay inside playing video games rather than going outside and committing crimes.

The same study has shown an increase in anger while playing video games.  This anger was for a short period of time, essentially getting the anger out of their system.  Other studies that have shown video games as having caused aggression have been found to be falsified or resulted from conditions that were ill-managed.  

During the majority of these tests, children have been put in rooms that are not a similar environment to playing a videogame at home. The kids are in labs being tested in a way that does not correlate to video games, but to violent images.  There is evidence outside of labs, though, that show a correlation between violent video games and violent behavior. 

To share some insight on this, I asked a teacher and a student from Ithaca High School to share their thoughts on the topic.

Are you familiar with video games?
Have you ever played a video game?
What is your opinion on video games?
Would you/your parent ever buy an M-rated game for a child under the recommended age?
Do you think that video games cause violence in young people?
What is your opinion on violence in other venues such as TV or books?

(Listen to the audio for full interviews)

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Decisions Decisions…By Elijah C

Leading up to senior year, many students begin to worry about college decisions. The CommonApp, a service which many schools use, becomes available August 1 of the summer before a student’s senior year. During application season, a period of time from August 1 to around January 2, many seniors are consumed more with completing their applications than doing well in school.
Then, coming after application season is decision season. This is when seniors find out which schools have accepted them and then make the tough decision of which school to go to. What affects a senior’s college choice or what they choose to study in college? Could it be classes in high school? Or maybe the extracurriculars that students partake in during their high school career?
To find answers, I talked to Tracy Lai, currently a senior at Ithaca High School. She has been in the Ithaca City School District since Kindergarten, starting at Cayuga Heights then making her way up to Ithaca High School. She isn’t your typical high schooler though. She’s double advanced in math and took AP Physics C during her junior year; however, when it comes to deciding what to study, she can be just like any other student. Tracy does many extracurricular activities. She is the vice president of Model UN, the president of Mock Trial Club and a part of the Brain Team. When she’s not busy with all these clubs, Tracy is playing the oboe or the piano, which she is very good at. Now, are her college decisions based on these activities? Let’s find out. (Listen to the audio to hear the full interview)
Are the choices of students affected by what they do in high school?
Has high school prepared seniors well for what lies ahead?
As we heard from Tracy, many seniors are fretting over their future during this stressful time. Some don’t know what they want to study while others have trouble narrowing down what they want to study to one single choice. Many aspects of high school can help seniors decide on their future. So, seniors, how do you feel college applications are affecting your senior year?

Decisions Decisions…
By Elijah C

Leading up to senior year, many students begin to worry about college decisions. The CommonApp, a service which many schools use, becomes available August 1 of the summer before a student’s senior year. During application season, a period of time from August 1 to around January 2, many seniors are consumed more with completing their applications than doing well in school.

Then, coming after application season is decision season. This is when seniors find out which schools have accepted them and then make the tough decision of which school to go to. What affects a senior’s college choice or what they choose to study in college? Could it be classes in high school? Or maybe the extracurriculars that students partake in during their high school career?

To find answers, I talked to Tracy Lai, currently a senior at Ithaca High School. She has been in the Ithaca City School District since Kindergarten, starting at Cayuga Heights then making her way up to Ithaca High School. She isn’t your typical high schooler though. She’s double advanced in math and took AP Physics C during her junior year; however, when it comes to deciding what to study, she can be just like any other student. Tracy does many extracurricular activities. She is the vice president of Model UN, the president of Mock Trial Club and a part of the Brain Team. When she’s not busy with all these clubs, Tracy is playing the oboe or the piano, which she is very good at. Now, are her college decisions based on these activities? Let’s find out. (Listen to the audio to hear the full interview)

Are the choices of students affected by what they do in high school?

Has high school prepared seniors well for what lies ahead?

As we heard from Tracy, many seniors are fretting over their future during this stressful time. Some don’t know what they want to study while others have trouble narrowing down what they want to study to one single choice. Many aspects of high school can help seniors decide on their future. So, seniors, how do you feel college applications are affecting your senior year?

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Disciplining Student AthletesBy Aven A

From Ithaca High School’s perspective, things seemed quiet at Cornell University this fall. But that’s far from the truth. One of the most shocking news pieces in college sports came out. The entire Cornell men’s lacrosse team was suspended and, two months later, the head coach of the team, Ben Deluc, a was fired.  
The incident that caused all of this mayhem was at a party hosted by the team. The issue was that the older members of the team forced freshmen recruits to drink alcohol by tying them up together and making them drink beer until they got to the point where they would throw up.  This isn’t an issue in high school, but I wondered what the athletic director and a student athlete felt about how we deal with sports discipline and how this affects the high school.

Disciplining Student Athletes
By Aven A

From Ithaca High School’s perspective, things seemed quiet at Cornell University this fall. But that’s far from the truth. One of the most shocking news pieces in college sports came out. The entire Cornell men’s lacrosse team was suspended and, two months later, the head coach of the team, Ben Deluc, a was fired. 

The incident that caused all of this mayhem was at a party hosted by the team. The issue was that the older members of the team forced freshmen recruits to drink alcohol by tying them up together and making them drink beer until they got to the point where they would throw up.  This isn’t an issue in high school, but I wondered what the athletic director and a student athlete felt about how we deal with sports discipline and how this affects the high school.